SEPTEMBER 10, 2008 – VOLUME 9, NO. 37
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This week's NEWS

EPA announces significant grants for research on microbiological issues. In Pennsylvania, it's all about optimization of filtration processes. D.C. lead-line replacement program is changed to lower cost and increase effectiveness. California chromium cleanup gets industry help.


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Federal Updates

State Updates

Microbiological

Arsenic

Chromium

  • Private funding will help in California chromium cleanup (Glendale News Press, September 9)
    Commentary: The anticipated Glendale City Council action will begin the next critical phase in cleaning up San Fernando Valley ground water from hexavalent chromium contamination. Industries are stepping up to the plate to help fund two innovative demonstration-scale projects that will show how high levels of the metal can be reduced to very low concentrations—far below the current maximum contaminant level and below local levels of concern.

Disinfection Byproducts

Lead

  • D.C. Water and Sewer Authority announces major change in its lead service line replacement program (WASA Press Release, September 4), but not everyone thinks it is a great idea (Washington Post, September 4)
    Commentary: Once again, D.C. WASA is looking for the cheap way out of its lead pipe dilemma. For years, there have been partial lead line replacements, which nobody thought was a good idea, and data showed continued potential for leaching high levels of lead. Certainly, the use of orthophosphate has dramatically decreased the lead levels at the tap under the required sampling regime. But sampling does not catch all of the lead exposure, and research has shown the potential for lead particulates to shear off of the interior surfaces of lead pipes still in service. D.C. WASA needs to get the lead out now—ALL the way out with an aggressive replacement of ALL lead service lines.

Fluoridation

PPCPs

Invasive Species

Legal Matters

Water Treatment

Desalination

Perchlorate

Bisphenol-A Plastic

Source Water Protection

Small Water Systems


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